Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Over 60? How To Look Stylish and Fabulous!

60-plus? Try these smart fashion tips to keep yourself looking stylish and fabulous.


Muumuus and mom jeans or spangled capris and Aloha shirts - is this really all the fashion world has to offer women over the age of 60? Do mature women who desire to dress fashionably for summer really have to choose between "frumpy and fogey" or "too young and trendy?"

Not at all, says Catherine Brock, who blogs about style on thebudgetfashionista.com.

"Reaching a certain age doesn't mean you have to give up your love of fashion, or that you can't be stylish," Brock says. "In our youth-obsessed society, many fashion trends are geared for young women, but truly stylish clothing can work for women of any age."

Joyce Williams (name changed to protect her privacy), a resident of Brookdale Belle Meade Senior Living Community in Nashville, Tennessee, agrees. Williams didn't leave her lifelong love of fashion behind upon moving into the senior community. Instead, she remains an avid reader of fashion magazines, and designs and makes her own jewelry to accessorize her wardrobe. She happily shares fashion advice with other residents who seek to remain stylish after 60.

Here are some of Brock's and Williams' favorite tips and insights for senior ladies:


  • Senior women can have trouble finding fashion images that feature women who could be their peers, Brock says. Because most clothing is marketed with images of younger models, many older women may worry about their clothes being "age-appropriate." Don't be limited by that kind of thinking, she advises. The age of the model wearing the fashion is far less important than whether the style will work for you.


  • Look for garments that have a defined shape. You don't have to wear form-fitting clothing, but do avoid overalls or baggy, pull-on pants and maxi dresses with no waistline, Brock advises.


  • Find your colors, Williams suggests. Everyone has certain colors that complement their skin tone, hair and eyes, and others that are less flattering. Determine which ones are yours and emphasize those colors in your wardrobe. Brock also counsels against putting too many colors in a single outfit, and says avoid wild color patterns. Instead, pick one piece in an outfit to make a color statement and use muted, complementary colors in the rest of the outfit to create a backdrop for your statement color.


  • Just as important as knowing your best colors, you should also know the visual line that looks best for your body type, Williams says. For example, if you're pear-shaped, a line that draws attention to your shoulders can be flattering, Brock adds. Apple-shaped women may find an A-line skirt flattering since it creates an angle from the shoulder to the waist.  And don't forget about your shoes!


  • Stay true to your own personal style, regardless of your age. "If you had a well-established personal style when you were younger, it doesn't need to change just because you're older," Brock says. "If anything, as you age, you can pay more attention to your personal style and be less of a slave to the season's trends." Adapt your younger style to your more mature place in life by focusing on creating outfits that make only one statement at a time, she advises. For example, wear that big, chunky turquoise necklace that you've always loved and pair it with an outfit that's simple and straightforward like a pair of tailored jeans and a white blouse.


  • Some styles work particularly well for senior women, Brock says. Blazers and cardigans pair well with V-neck tops, sheath dresses, shift dresses and button-down shirts. "In warmer months, V-neck tops with elbow-length sleeves are the new T-shirt for seniors," she says. "Just add a necklace for a little sparkle." Plus, every senior woman should have wardrobe staples such as a black blazer, white button-down shirt, dark-wash jeans, straight-leg trousers, neutral-colored cardigans, a collection of dolman-sleeve tops and T-shirts with varying sleeve lengths and necklines.


  • Never underestimate the power of great accessories, Williams says. The right jewelry can turn an ordinary outfit into something stunning, and you can change the entire look of an outfit simply by switching around your accessories.  If your medical alert pendant clashes with your style, just tuck it inside your blouse.


"It's never too late to discover your personal style," Brock says. "Start by creating a Pinterest board and saving looks you love (get a fashion-minded younger friend to help if you're not tech-savvy). Then reacquaint yourself with your body type and go shopping with a friend. Try on different cuts of pants, skirts and dresses until you both agree on which are the most flattering. Find the cuts that look good on you and then start experimenting with colors and textures."

- Article courtesy of BPT.

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Why Get A Medical Alert System? Real Emergencies Tell The Story


Actual transcripts of medical alert emergencies tell the real story of what happens when someone presses their button.


Editor's Note: Some readers will find the graphic nature of these real life emergencies distressing. Proceed with caution.  Emergency dispatch transcripts are CAPITALIZED to minimize spelling errors and speed communication with first responders.

Medical Alert SystemWe often hear the line "I've fallen and I can't get up" as a punch line or a joke, bringing back memories of the old commercial with the lady fallen in her bathroom.  But falling is no joke, and can lead to serious consequences...including death.

Fortunately, not all the calls we receive for help are that dramatic or life threatening.  Many times someone just needs help getting up, something known as a "lift assist".  But make no mistake - if a senior presses the button looking for help they are worried and anxious and concerned.  This is not a joke - this is serious business and can impact their ability to continue to live independently in their own homes.

Below are some examples of actual medical alert button calls we receive from our clients.  If you or a loved one don't think this can happen to you....think again.  1 in 3 seniors will fall in their own home each year, and the chance of falling again are doubled after the first fall.  Anyone taking multiple medications is highly susceptible to falling or having balance issues. Chronic conditions like COPD, asthma, high blood pressure, diabetes, seizures, and so on also increase the need for being able to get help quickly in an emergency.

Fallen, with injuries


woman fallen on floor
  • RECEIVED A MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM ACTIVATION FROM [NAME REDACTED] WHO STATED SHE HAD FALLEN IN THE NIGHT AND MAY HAVE BROKEN HER HIP, REQUESTED EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE. DISPATCHED MEDICAL RESPONSE AND NOTIFIED [NAME REDACTED] 
  • RECEIVED AN EMERGENCY FALL DETECTED ALARM. WE SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] WHO FELL AND STATED [NAME REDACTED] WAS FEELING WEAK. WE THEN DISPATCHED EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE.
  • SPOKE TO FEMALE INDICATED FALLEN AND CAN'T GET UP. UNABLE TO VERIFY IF INJURIES SUSTAINED. STS LOCATED IN BACK ROOM.
  • SPOKE WITH FEMALE WHO HAS FALLEN. STATES SHE IS BLEEDING FROM NOSE. SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED] . STATES SHE IS IN THE DINING ROOM ON THE FLOOR. FEELS A LITTLE DIZZY DUE TO FALL
  • SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] STS SHE FELL AND NEEDS HELP UP WAS YELLING AND IN PAIN. 
  • SPOKE WITH FEMALE. STS [NAME REDACTED]  HAS FALLEN AND CANNOT GET UP. CONFIRMED BLEEDING FROM BIG TOE AND NAIL IS COMING OFF   HAD FALLEN. ALSO HER BIG TOE WAS BLEEDING AND THE NAIL WAS COMING OFF. AT HER REQUEST, WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE
elderly man fallen, getting help
  • SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED] . STS FELL IN THE BEDROOM AND NEEDS HELP. REQ DEA  SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED] STS ON SITE BUT CANNOT LIFT [NAME REDACTED] RECEIVED SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED] STS [NAME REDACTED]  WAS TAKEN TO THE HOSPITAL WITH A HEAD INJURY. 
  • RECEIVED A MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM. WE SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED]  WHO STATED THAT SHE FELL IN HER KITCHEN AND HURT HER HIP. WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE TO HER HOME ADDRESS AND NOTIFIED [NAME REDACTED] 
  • WE RECEIVED A MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM. WE SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED]  (HEALTH AID) WHO STATED THAT [NAME REDACTED]  HAD  FALLEN AND INJURED HIS HEAD AND LEG WHICH WERE BLEEDING. WE DISPATCHED EMS 
  • [NAME REDACTED]  STATES SHE HAS FALLEN IN THE LIVING ROOM AND MAY HAVE BROKEN HER SHOULDER. 
  • WE RECEIVED AN ALARM. WE SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED]  HE STATED HE HIT HIS HEAD AND IS ON THE SECOND FLOOR. WE RECEIVED AND ADDL ALARM AND [NAME REDACTED] STATED HE WAS ON THE FLOOR AND COULDN'T GET UP. WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY SERVICES
  • WE RECEIVED A MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM FROM [NAME REDACTED] , WE SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED] WHO STATED THAT SHE FELL IN THE BATHROOM AND HIT HER HEAD ON THE FLOOR, SHE STATED THAT SHE WAS BLEEDING FROM THE HEAD

Fallen, not injured, needs "Lift Assist"

  • SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED]  STS NEEDS HELP GETTING UP STS IS NOT INJURED 
elderly woman in home
  • SPOKE W/ CONTACT [NAME REDACTED]  ADVISED MOTHER [NAME REDACTED]  HAD FALLEN. NOT  INJURED NOR BLEEDING BUT DOES NEED ASSISTANCE GETTING HER UP.
  • SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] , REQUESTING HELP FOR A FALL, UNKNOWN ON INJURIES AT THIS TIME
  • SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] STS [NAME REDACTED] IS FALLING OUT OF THE CHAIR, NEEDS A LIFT ASSIST. 
  • SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED]  STS HE IS NOT HURT, BUT FELL DOWN AND NEEDS HELP GETTING UP. 
  • SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] STS SHE FELL BUT IS NOT INJURED, REQ LIFT ASSIST STS SHE IS JUST INSIDE THE BACK DOOR 
  • [NAME REDACTED]  REQ LIFT ASSIST NO INJURIES HE IS IN BATHROOM , FRONT DOOR UNLOCKED 

General Illness, Not Injured

  • RECEIVED A GPS EMERGENCY ALARM. WE SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] WHO STATED THAT SHE WAS SICK. WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY SERVICES, NOTIFIED THE CALL LIST, AND UPDATED THE AUTHORITIES.
  • WE RECEIVED MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM FROM [NAME REDACTED]  WHO STATES SHE IS ON THE FLOOR AND POSSIBLY BLEEDING FROM HER REAR END.  EMERGENCY SERVICES WERE REQUESTED AND DISPATCHED. 
  • SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED]  REGARDING [NAME REDACTED]  STS HE IS HAVING SEVERE STOMACH PAIN AND HE NEEDS EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE. HE IS NOT INJURED OR BLEEDING. SHE WILL BE THERE TO UNLOCK THE DOOR 

Automobile Accident (Using HOME & AWAY Medical Alert Pendant with GPS)

  • WE RECEIVED AN ACTUAL GPS MEDICAL ALARM. WE SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED] WHO ADVISED THEY WERE IN A CAR ACCIDENT AND SHE INJURED HER HEAD DURING THE ACCIDENT. WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY MEDICAL RESPONDERS AND NOTIFIED CONTACTS
  • WE RECEIVED A GPS - FALL DETECTED ALARM. WE SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] SHE STATED SHE WAS IN A CAR ACCIDENT. SHE DID NOT THINK SHE WAS INJURED. WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE. WE NOTIFIED CONTACT [NAME REDACTED]

High Blood Pressure, Possible Stroke

  • WE RECEIVED A MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM.  SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] WHO STATED [NAME REDACTED] HAS HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE AND HAS HAD STROKES SO THEY ARE CONCERNED. STATES IN LIVING ROOM.   WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE.
  • WE RECEIVED A MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM. WE SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] WHO INDICATED THAT HIS BLOOD PRESSURE WAS GOING CRAZY. WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY MEDICAL ASSISTANCE. WE NOTIFIED HIS CONTACTS.
  • SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED]  STS WIFE IS UNABLE TO GET UP FROM THE BATHROOM INTO WHEELCHAIR. IS ACTING VERY CONFUSED. STS SHE MIGHT NEED TO GO TO THE HOSPITAL. 
  • WE RECEIVED A MEDICAL ALARM FROM AND SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED] SHE STATED THAT SHE NEEDED SOMEONE TO COME AND CHECK HER BLOOD PRESSURE. SHE WAS UNABLE TO BEND OVER AND WAS EXPERIENCING PRESSURE IN THE TOP OF HER HEAD

Heart Attack, Chest Pains

  • RECEIVED MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED]  STS SHE IS  HAVING CHEST PAIN REQ EMS
  • WE RECEIVED A MEDICAL FALL DETECTION ALARM. WE SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] WHO SAID [NAME REDACTED] WAS EXPERIENCING PAIN UNDER HER RIGHT ARM. WE THEN CONFERENCE THEM TO DISPATCH AND NOTIFIED THE CALL LIST.
  • SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED]  STS FELL ON THE COUCH AND FEEL LIKE SHES HAVING A HEART ATTACK, SHE NEEDED AN AMBULANCE.
  • WE RECEIVED A MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM. WE SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] WHO STATED HER MOTHER [NAME REDACTED] WAS HAVING CHEST PAINS AND WAS SENT HOME FROM THE DR'S WITH AN ABNORMAL EKG. WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY SERVICE
elderly woman out of breath on stairs

Shortness of Breath

  • WE RECEIVED A MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM.  [NAME REDACTED] STS LEFT ARM NUMB, SHORT OF BREATH, THROWING UP
  • RECEIVED MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM SPOKE TO  [NAME REDACTED] AID STS  [NAME REDACTED] IS FEELING 
  • DIZZY AND SHORT OF BREATH REQ EMS, EMS WAS DISPATCHED NTFD CONTAC
  • T  [NAME REDACTED]  
  • WE RECEIVED A MEDICAL ALARM WE SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] WHO STATED THAT [NAME REDACTED]  IS SHORT OF BREATH, HIS LIPS ARE TURNING BLUE, HIS FEET ARE SWOLLEN. WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY SERVICE.


Emergencies like these happen every day all over the country.  We help save lives by dispatching emergency services and notifying family members and caregivers when seconds count the most.  With most medical alert systems costing just around $1 a day, it's a simple and cost effective way to help family members live independently at home with the peace of mind knowing help is just a button press away.  Visit www.MedicalCareAlert.com to learn more or call us at 1-855-272-1010