Thursday, August 17, 2017

3 Important Tips To Avoid Scams Targeting Seniors

Anyone who’s retired knows how important maintaining your nest egg is. 

You want to be able to comfortably live off the distributions from the money you worked so hard to earn throughout your life. Unfortunately, scammers are also aware that seniors are financially stable compared to the rest of the population, which makes them a target. 20% of Americans age 65 and up have been defrauded financially. Bearing this in mind, it’s of the utmost importance to be aware of how to recognize and avoid scams, whether you’re a senior or a caregiver providing for a senior.

Tip 1: A member of government or the IRS will never ask you to reveal personal information over the phone

One of the most common scam tactics is to impersonate a government official. These scammers will call seniors and demand that they reveal personal information like their social security number (SSN), because of some false charge of tax fraud or some other made up crime.

Tip 2: An email claiming you won money and asking for financial information to send you the winnings should be an immediate red flag


This type of scam is called “phishing” and can take

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

5 Ways To Save Money on Prescription Drugs

Use these easy tips to help save money on prescription drug costs.

Modern medications can work wonders, improving quality of life, curing illness and even saving lives. However, those miracles can come at a high cost, as anyone who's had to pay for branded prescription medication knows. In fact, spending on prescription drugs has increased 73 percent in the past seven years, according to a new report from the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association (BCBSA).


What's driving the increase in prescription drug costs


The Health of America Report found prescription drug spending by Blue Cross and Blue Shield (BCBS) members increased 10 percent annually since 2010. High costs of patent-protected prescription drugs account for the lion's share of the total increase.

Generic drugs account for 82 percent of total prescriptions filled, but account for just 37 percent of total drug spending. By contrast, patent-protected prescription drugs comprise less than 10 percent of all prescriptions filled but account for 63 percent of total drug spending, the report found.

"Experience and past price trends suggest drug costs will continue to rise in the future," says Maureen Sullivan, chief strategy and innovation officer for BCBS. "The need for more affordable generic alternatives to costly patent-protected brand-name pharmaceuticals is urgent. As prices continue to rise, more consumers will be looking for ways to curb the cost of their medications."

What you can do to lower the cost of your prescription drugs

It is possible to lower your drug costs while still taking the medications your doctor has prescribed to help your health. BCBSA offers some guidance:


  • If your doctor prescribes a costly name-brand medication, ask your physician or pharmacist if a generic version is available. Generic drugs are identical to their brand-name equivalents in dosage form, safety, strength and quality, how you take them, performance and intended use, according to the Food and Drug Administration. Generics typically cost less than name-brand medications. The BCBSA report shows how costs for medicines like Lipitor (atorvastatin) and Avapro (irbesartan) plummet when generic alternatives become available.


  • It may be possible for your doctor to prescribe a higher strength than you need of a particular medication and allow you to split the tablet or pill to get the lower dose you need at a lower cost. In fact, many pills that can be safely split come pre-scored with an indentation that makes it easier to cut them in half. However, not all prescription medications can be safely split, so be sure to talk to your doctor or pharmacist about whether it's safe to split your medications.


  • Ordering prescription drug medications through the mail could lower drug costs, but it's important to ensure you're buying from your pharmacy benefit manager, typically listed on the back of an insurance card. The FDA recommends you only purchase drugs from organizations located in the U.S. and licensed by the state board of pharmacy where the company operates (find a list of state boards of pharmacy at www.nabp.info). The mail order pharmacy should have a licensed pharmacist available to answer your questions, require a prescription from your doctor in order to sell you medication, and have someone you can talk to directly if you have questions or problems.


  • Another way to reduce prescription drug costs is to ask your doctor to write your prescription for a 90-day supply so that you will get a three-month supply of the medication for the price of one co-pay.


  • Finally, review your prescriptions with your doctor at least every six months to ensure you're not taking any more medicines than you absolutely need. However, never skip doses of medicine, avoid refilling a prescription or stop taking medicine altogether without first consulting your doctor.

Medical Alert System with fall detection pendant
Remember, taking multiple prescription drugs can sometimes cause unintended side effects, including dizziness, disorientation and confusion.  A medical alert system with automatic fall detection built into the pendant can help reduce the risk of falling in the event of a prescription drug medication interaction.

For more information about prescription drug costs, and to read the full Health of America report, visit www.bcbs.com/healthofamerica.

Editors Note: Article courtesy of BPT.  All product names, logos, and brands are property of their respective owners and used for identification purposes only. Use of these names, logos, and brands does not imply endorsement.

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Maintaining Your Independence with Home Health Services

Staying healthy and out of the hospital is a top priority for the majority of seniors. 

However, as you age, you may need additional care to meet your medical needs after an illness, injury or exacerbation of a chronic health problem. Fortunately, this doesn't necessarily mean a long hospital or rehab stay, thanks to home health service options.

For Yoko and Kenneth Gilbert, both age 84, home health services provided important care when they needed it the most. After an injury caused by a fall Yoko needed nursing care for her wounds. She also needed physical therapy to regain her ability to get around. Her husband's help could only go so far, but he could not provide the professional care that she required, so at her doctor's advice, she decided to get home health services.



What is home health care?


According to Medicare.gov, "Home health care is a wide range of health care services that can be given in your home for an illness or injury. Home health care is usually less expensive, more convenient and just as effective as care you get in a hospital or skilled nursing facility (SNF)."

Every home health plan of care is individualized based on the person's unique medical needs and abilities. The goal is to treat the person's medical condition at home so that he or she can enjoy a high quality of life while receiving professional services designed to restore health, self-sufficiency and independence.

For Yoko, this gave her important peace of mind. She decided to work with Brookdale Home Health for her specific needs. "They came every week, changed my dressing and catheter," she says. "Everything was just great."

When are home health services used?


For seniors residing at home or in a senior living community, both medical and non-medical home care are options. The people most likely to need home health services are those recently diagnosed with a new illness, those who have been injured in a fall or other event, and those who have experienced a major change in health condition such as the worsening of a chronic disease process.

To provide these services, a health care professional will come to your place of residence. This may include a nurse, a physical therapist, an occupational therapist, a speech therapist, a home health aide or a medical social worker. Because these professionals come to you, you're able to remain in the comfort and security of your own home. Receiving care at home enhances your physical and mental well-being and promotes dignity and independence.

For Yoko, part of her home health care services were provided by a physical therapist named Barbara. "Barbara was wonderful," she says. "She took care of me, she pushed me and because of her I can move around better."

Yoko's husband, Kenneth, says the services were more than just health care. "Brookdale Home Health helped her a lot. Her therapists really lifted her spirits," he adds.

How can you get home health services?


Before Yoko could receive home health care, she got a referral from her doctor. A doctor is in charge of determining whether you are a candidate for home health services. If you think you are a candidate, it's important to have an honest conversation with your physician to see if home health is the right option for you.

If your doctor decides that home health is right for you, begin to research options in your area. With a doctor's prescription, the Brookdale Home Health team of experts can provide care based upon your unique medical needs in the privacy of your home.

Is home health covered by insurance?


Home health services are often covered by health insurance, but you should verify the details with your particular plan provider. Many plans offer 100 percent coverage if certain conditions are met. For example, Brookdale Home Health services may be covered by 100 percent of your Medicare Part A benefit if your doctor determines that you are homebound and that home health services are medically necessary to treat your illness, injury or change in medical condition.

For those who have to pay out of pocket, home health services often start at around $20 an hour with a three hour minimum, depending on the level of service needed.  Many clients with medical alert systems enjoy having someone come by to do light cleaning and housekeeping, but keep their medical alert button in the event of an emergency.

Yoko saw great improvements in her condition through home health services. However, she eventually experienced additional medical complications that require 24 hour care. Her husband could not keep up with the demands and sought respite care in a Brookdale community. After receiving respite services, they have decided to move in to a Brookdale Senior Living community full-time.

"My wife got sick and there was no way I could take care of her," says Kenneth. "We moved into a Brookdale community on Valentine's Day and we've been here ever since."

Today they are permanent residents of Patriot Heights in San Antonio, Texas, where they receive the full-time care they need, enjoy a full social calendar and have made many new friends.

- Article Courtesy of BPT

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Over 60? How To Look Stylish and Fabulous!

60-plus? Try these smart fashion tips to keep yourself looking stylish and fabulous.


Muumuus and mom jeans or spangled capris and Aloha shirts - is this really all the fashion world has to offer women over the age of 60? Do mature women who desire to dress fashionably for summer really have to choose between "frumpy and fogey" or "too young and trendy?"

Not at all, says Catherine Brock, who blogs about style on thebudgetfashionista.com.

"Reaching a certain age doesn't mean you have to give up your love of fashion, or that you can't be stylish," Brock says. "In our youth-obsessed society, many fashion trends are geared for young women, but truly stylish clothing can work for women of any age."

Joyce Williams (name changed to protect her privacy), a resident of Brookdale Belle Meade Senior Living Community in Nashville, Tennessee, agrees. Williams didn't leave her lifelong love of fashion behind upon moving into the senior community. Instead, she remains an avid reader of fashion magazines, and designs and makes her own jewelry to accessorize her wardrobe. She happily shares fashion advice with other residents who seek to remain stylish after 60.

Here are some of Brock's and Williams' favorite tips and insights for senior ladies:


  • Senior women can have trouble finding fashion images that feature women who could be their peers, Brock says. Because most clothing is marketed with images of younger models, many older women may worry about their clothes being "age-appropriate." Don't be limited by that kind of thinking, she advises. The age of the model wearing the fashion is far less important than whether the style will work for you.


  • Look for garments that have a defined shape. You don't have to wear form-fitting clothing, but do avoid overalls or baggy, pull-on pants and maxi dresses with no waistline, Brock advises.


  • Find your colors, Williams suggests. Everyone has certain colors that complement their skin tone, hair and eyes, and others that are less flattering. Determine which ones are yours and emphasize those colors in your wardrobe. Brock also counsels against putting too many colors in a single outfit, and says avoid wild color patterns. Instead, pick one piece in an outfit to make a color statement and use muted, complementary colors in the rest of the outfit to create a backdrop for your statement color.


  • Just as important as knowing your best colors, you should also know the visual line that looks best for your body type, Williams says. For example, if you're pear-shaped, a line that draws attention to your shoulders can be flattering, Brock adds. Apple-shaped women may find an A-line skirt flattering since it creates an angle from the shoulder to the waist.  And don't forget about your shoes!


  • Stay true to your own personal style, regardless of your age. "If you had a well-established personal style when you were younger, it doesn't need to change just because you're older," Brock says. "If anything, as you age, you can pay more attention to your personal style and be less of a slave to the season's trends." Adapt your younger style to your more mature place in life by focusing on creating outfits that make only one statement at a time, she advises. For example, wear that big, chunky turquoise necklace that you've always loved and pair it with an outfit that's simple and straightforward like a pair of tailored jeans and a white blouse.


  • Some styles work particularly well for senior women, Brock says. Blazers and cardigans pair well with V-neck tops, sheath dresses, shift dresses and button-down shirts. "In warmer months, V-neck tops with elbow-length sleeves are the new T-shirt for seniors," she says. "Just add a necklace for a little sparkle." Plus, every senior woman should have wardrobe staples such as a black blazer, white button-down shirt, dark-wash jeans, straight-leg trousers, neutral-colored cardigans, a collection of dolman-sleeve tops and T-shirts with varying sleeve lengths and necklines.


  • Never underestimate the power of great accessories, Williams says. The right jewelry can turn an ordinary outfit into something stunning, and you can change the entire look of an outfit simply by switching around your accessories.  If your medical alert pendant clashes with your style, just tuck it inside your blouse.


"It's never too late to discover your personal style," Brock says. "Start by creating a Pinterest board and saving looks you love (get a fashion-minded younger friend to help if you're not tech-savvy). Then reacquaint yourself with your body type and go shopping with a friend. Try on different cuts of pants, skirts and dresses until you both agree on which are the most flattering. Find the cuts that look good on you and then start experimenting with colors and textures."

- Article courtesy of BPT.

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Why Get A Medical Alert System? Real Emergencies Tell The Story


Actual transcripts of medical alert emergencies tell the real story of what happens when someone presses their button.


Editor's Note: Some readers will find the graphic nature of these real life emergencies distressing. Proceed with caution.  Emergency dispatch transcripts are CAPITALIZED to minimize spelling errors and speed communication with first responders.

Medical Alert SystemWe often hear the line "I've fallen and I can't get up" as a punch line or a joke, bringing back memories of the old commercial with the lady fallen in her bathroom.  But falling is no joke, and can lead to serious consequences...including death.

Fortunately, not all the calls we receive for help are that dramatic or life threatening.  Many times someone just needs help getting up, something known as a "lift assist".  But make no mistake - if a senior presses the button looking for help they are worried and anxious and concerned.  This is not a joke - this is serious business and can impact their ability to continue to live independently in their own homes.

Below are some examples of actual medical alert button calls we receive from our clients.  If you or a loved one don't think this can happen to you....think again.  1 in 3 seniors will fall in their own home each year, and the chance of falling again are doubled after the first fall.  Anyone taking multiple medications is highly susceptible to falling or having balance issues. Chronic conditions like COPD, asthma, high blood pressure, diabetes, seizures, and so on also increase the need for being able to get help quickly in an emergency.

Fallen, with injuries


woman fallen on floor
  • RECEIVED A MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM ACTIVATION FROM [NAME REDACTED] WHO STATED SHE HAD FALLEN IN THE NIGHT AND MAY HAVE BROKEN HER HIP, REQUESTED EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE. DISPATCHED MEDICAL RESPONSE AND NOTIFIED [NAME REDACTED] 
  • RECEIVED AN EMERGENCY FALL DETECTED ALARM. WE SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] WHO FELL AND STATED [NAME REDACTED] WAS FEELING WEAK. WE THEN DISPATCHED EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE.
  • SPOKE TO FEMALE INDICATED FALLEN AND CAN'T GET UP. UNABLE TO VERIFY IF INJURIES SUSTAINED. STS LOCATED IN BACK ROOM.
  • SPOKE WITH FEMALE WHO HAS FALLEN. STATES SHE IS BLEEDING FROM NOSE. SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED] . STATES SHE IS IN THE DINING ROOM ON THE FLOOR. FEELS A LITTLE DIZZY DUE TO FALL
  • SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] STS SHE FELL AND NEEDS HELP UP WAS YELLING AND IN PAIN. 
  • SPOKE WITH FEMALE. STS [NAME REDACTED]  HAS FALLEN AND CANNOT GET UP. CONFIRMED BLEEDING FROM BIG TOE AND NAIL IS COMING OFF   HAD FALLEN. ALSO HER BIG TOE WAS BLEEDING AND THE NAIL WAS COMING OFF. AT HER REQUEST, WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE
elderly man fallen, getting help
  • SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED] . STS FELL IN THE BEDROOM AND NEEDS HELP. REQ DEA  SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED] STS ON SITE BUT CANNOT LIFT [NAME REDACTED] RECEIVED SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED] STS [NAME REDACTED]  WAS TAKEN TO THE HOSPITAL WITH A HEAD INJURY. 
  • RECEIVED A MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM. WE SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED]  WHO STATED THAT SHE FELL IN HER KITCHEN AND HURT HER HIP. WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE TO HER HOME ADDRESS AND NOTIFIED [NAME REDACTED] 
  • WE RECEIVED A MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM. WE SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED]  (HEALTH AID) WHO STATED THAT [NAME REDACTED]  HAD  FALLEN AND INJURED HIS HEAD AND LEG WHICH WERE BLEEDING. WE DISPATCHED EMS 
  • [NAME REDACTED]  STATES SHE HAS FALLEN IN THE LIVING ROOM AND MAY HAVE BROKEN HER SHOULDER. 
  • WE RECEIVED AN ALARM. WE SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED]  HE STATED HE HIT HIS HEAD AND IS ON THE SECOND FLOOR. WE RECEIVED AND ADDL ALARM AND [NAME REDACTED] STATED HE WAS ON THE FLOOR AND COULDN'T GET UP. WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY SERVICES
  • WE RECEIVED A MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM FROM [NAME REDACTED] , WE SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED] WHO STATED THAT SHE FELL IN THE BATHROOM AND HIT HER HEAD ON THE FLOOR, SHE STATED THAT SHE WAS BLEEDING FROM THE HEAD

Fallen, not injured, needs "Lift Assist"

  • SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED]  STS NEEDS HELP GETTING UP STS IS NOT INJURED 
elderly woman in home
  • SPOKE W/ CONTACT [NAME REDACTED]  ADVISED MOTHER [NAME REDACTED]  HAD FALLEN. NOT  INJURED NOR BLEEDING BUT DOES NEED ASSISTANCE GETTING HER UP.
  • SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] , REQUESTING HELP FOR A FALL, UNKNOWN ON INJURIES AT THIS TIME
  • SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] STS [NAME REDACTED] IS FALLING OUT OF THE CHAIR, NEEDS A LIFT ASSIST. 
  • SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED]  STS HE IS NOT HURT, BUT FELL DOWN AND NEEDS HELP GETTING UP. 
  • SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] STS SHE FELL BUT IS NOT INJURED, REQ LIFT ASSIST STS SHE IS JUST INSIDE THE BACK DOOR 
  • [NAME REDACTED]  REQ LIFT ASSIST NO INJURIES HE IS IN BATHROOM , FRONT DOOR UNLOCKED 

General Illness, Not Injured

  • RECEIVED A GPS EMERGENCY ALARM. WE SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] WHO STATED THAT SHE WAS SICK. WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY SERVICES, NOTIFIED THE CALL LIST, AND UPDATED THE AUTHORITIES.
  • WE RECEIVED MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM FROM [NAME REDACTED]  WHO STATES SHE IS ON THE FLOOR AND POSSIBLY BLEEDING FROM HER REAR END.  EMERGENCY SERVICES WERE REQUESTED AND DISPATCHED. 
  • SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED]  REGARDING [NAME REDACTED]  STS HE IS HAVING SEVERE STOMACH PAIN AND HE NEEDS EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE. HE IS NOT INJURED OR BLEEDING. SHE WILL BE THERE TO UNLOCK THE DOOR 

Automobile Accident (Using HOME & AWAY Medical Alert Pendant with GPS)

  • WE RECEIVED AN ACTUAL GPS MEDICAL ALARM. WE SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED] WHO ADVISED THEY WERE IN A CAR ACCIDENT AND SHE INJURED HER HEAD DURING THE ACCIDENT. WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY MEDICAL RESPONDERS AND NOTIFIED CONTACTS
  • WE RECEIVED A GPS - FALL DETECTED ALARM. WE SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] SHE STATED SHE WAS IN A CAR ACCIDENT. SHE DID NOT THINK SHE WAS INJURED. WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE. WE NOTIFIED CONTACT [NAME REDACTED]

High Blood Pressure, Possible Stroke

  • WE RECEIVED A MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM.  SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] WHO STATED [NAME REDACTED] HAS HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE AND HAS HAD STROKES SO THEY ARE CONCERNED. STATES IN LIVING ROOM.   WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE.
  • WE RECEIVED A MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM. WE SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] WHO INDICATED THAT HIS BLOOD PRESSURE WAS GOING CRAZY. WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY MEDICAL ASSISTANCE. WE NOTIFIED HIS CONTACTS.
  • SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED]  STS WIFE IS UNABLE TO GET UP FROM THE BATHROOM INTO WHEELCHAIR. IS ACTING VERY CONFUSED. STS SHE MIGHT NEED TO GO TO THE HOSPITAL. 
  • WE RECEIVED A MEDICAL ALARM FROM AND SPOKE WITH [NAME REDACTED] SHE STATED THAT SHE NEEDED SOMEONE TO COME AND CHECK HER BLOOD PRESSURE. SHE WAS UNABLE TO BEND OVER AND WAS EXPERIENCING PRESSURE IN THE TOP OF HER HEAD

Heart Attack, Chest Pains

  • RECEIVED MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED]  STS SHE IS  HAVING CHEST PAIN REQ EMS
  • WE RECEIVED A MEDICAL FALL DETECTION ALARM. WE SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] WHO SAID [NAME REDACTED] WAS EXPERIENCING PAIN UNDER HER RIGHT ARM. WE THEN CONFERENCE THEM TO DISPATCH AND NOTIFIED THE CALL LIST.
  • SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED]  STS FELL ON THE COUCH AND FEEL LIKE SHES HAVING A HEART ATTACK, SHE NEEDED AN AMBULANCE.
  • WE RECEIVED A MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM. WE SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] WHO STATED HER MOTHER [NAME REDACTED] WAS HAVING CHEST PAINS AND WAS SENT HOME FROM THE DR'S WITH AN ABNORMAL EKG. WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY SERVICE
elderly woman out of breath on stairs

Shortness of Breath

  • WE RECEIVED A MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM.  [NAME REDACTED] STS LEFT ARM NUMB, SHORT OF BREATH, THROWING UP
  • RECEIVED MEDICAL PENDANT ALARM SPOKE TO  [NAME REDACTED] AID STS  [NAME REDACTED] IS FEELING 
  • DIZZY AND SHORT OF BREATH REQ EMS, EMS WAS DISPATCHED NTFD CONTAC
  • T  [NAME REDACTED]  
  • WE RECEIVED A MEDICAL ALARM WE SPOKE TO [NAME REDACTED] WHO STATED THAT [NAME REDACTED]  IS SHORT OF BREATH, HIS LIPS ARE TURNING BLUE, HIS FEET ARE SWOLLEN. WE DISPATCHED EMERGENCY SERVICE.


Emergencies like these happen every day all over the country.  We help save lives by dispatching emergency services and notifying family members and caregivers when seconds count the most.  With most medical alert systems costing just around $1 a day, it's a simple and cost effective way to help family members live independently at home with the peace of mind knowing help is just a button press away.  Visit www.MedicalCareAlert.com to learn more or call us at 1-855-272-1010





Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Preventing Falls on The Stairs

The vast majority of stairway falls result from a loss of balance.  So why do we need to worry so much about falls on stairs?

Stairs of all types have been used since ancient times, and because they are inherently hazardous, people have been falling on them, getting hurt or even killed in the process.

The fact is that some incidents can be caused by inattention, unsafe behavior, and inappropriate footwear.

But the good news is you can take a few simple steps (pun intended) to make your stairway and home safer, and prevent falls in the process.

Limit Upstairs Use

If it is possible to arrange a house to avoid having to climb stairs, do so. A stair fall can easily cause severe injuries.

Check the Carpet

Make sure that there is no carpet that’s sticking up or ruffled. If carpeting starts to become loose in a stairwell, tack it down or reinstall it completely.



Inspect Handrails Often

Loose handrails are of no use to you because you cannot trust them to hold your weight when you push on them. Inspect hand rails to make sure that they do not easily move in your hands and repair them as soon as you notice something loose.

Go Slowly

It’s not a race. Going a little slower on the stairs has the potential to save your life.

Repair Walkways

Even a little crack can cause a big problem. If you go out often, hire someone to repair any damage to walkways.

Keep Walkways Clean

Arrange to have leaves, snow, and ice removed from stairs and walkways. Use salt or sand throughout the winter months. Kitty litter is especially effective.


Because stairway accidents can cause severe injury and even death, building codes for stairs and ramps are justifiably very rigorous. Good design can substantially reduce the potential for mis-stepping by providing the means to retrieve our balance, but even the best design cannot eliminate falling hazards entirely. The need for proper design also applies to ramps.

Learn more about preventing falls with an automatic fall detection medical alert system here, or search online with hashtag #NoFalls.


Monday, May 22, 2017

Preventing Falls In The Home - 7 Simple Steps

Following safety rules in the home is very important for fall prevention. 

Keeping things neat, clean, and tidy can prevent a lot of falls. Here are some things to think about if you have trouble getting around.

Remove All Throw Rugs

Those throw rugs can catch on your toes and cause falls. If you’re in the kitchen a lot, consider putting in textured linoleum or thin carpeting.

Clean Spills Immediately

“I’ll get to it later.” Unfortunately, those ‘later’ things cause hazards for those who are walking around. Immediate cleaning means you don’t have to pay attention to them anymore.

Keep Everything Closed

Murphy’s Law says that if there’s a possibility that you can bump into it, it will be bumped into. Closing cabinets, drawers, and doors when they’re in the way takes only a second.

Brighten The Dark Corners

In larger houses, there are plenty of dark corners which can cause trouble. Setting up lights where you need them will not only brighten up the house, but brighten up your life.

Keep Clothes Organized

Store clothing, bed coverings, and other household items where you can comfortably reach them.

Get Help if you need it

If you find that something is heavier than you can lift, get assistance or reduce the load as much as you can.

Our goal is to help you to create a safe environment at home. We feel like education is key - that's why we provide this free fall prevention guide, and lots of other good ideas about independent living on our "Thrive!" blog or search using hashtag #NoFalls.